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EsSay

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EALRs and Essay Writing

 

1.1.1 Applies more than one strategy for generating ideas and planning writing. Rule of three Gathers information and uses an organizer )to analyze and/or synthesize to plan writing.

 

2.1.1 Applies understanding of multiple and varied audiences

 

2.2.1 Demonstrates understanding of different purposes for writing. Writes to analyze informational text or data

 

3.1.1 Analyzes ideas, selects a narrow topic, and elaborates using specific details and/or examples.

 

Component 4.1: Analyzes and evaluates others’ and own writing.

 

1.3.1 Revises text, including changing words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas. Rereads work several times and has a different focus for each reading (e.g., first reading — adding details for elaboration; second reading — deleting sentences or phrases to achieve paragraph unity; third reading — reorganizing ideas for meaning). Records feedback using writing group procedure (e.g., partner underlines telling sentences, such as “I had fun,” and writer changes to show detail, “I squealed as the roller coaster sped around a corner.”). Makes decisions about writing based on feedback (e.g., revision before final draft). Uses multiple resources to identify needed changes (e.g., writing guide, peer, adult, computer, thesaurus).

 

 

 

Essay Plan

 

PREWRITE

 

2.1.1 Audience 2.2.1 Purpose

To whom are you writing? What will they want to know?

Why are you writing? Choose ideas and details that match your purpose.

 

1.1.1 Gather information or organize it: Use a web, tree, or list.

 

 

  • WEB : (Click for a sample web prewriting)

Put your central idea in the center circle of the web. Each line from the web represents a new idea and paragraph to support your central idea. Add lines (at least three, but preferably six) to each of the three supporting idea lines. On those lines write specific details (examples, explanations, evidence, elaboration, experiences, who, what, when, where, why, how) about EACH of your three supporting ideas. This organizes your work into three paragraphs, complete with your topic sentence ideas.

 

  • TREE : (Click for a sample tree prewriting)

Put your central idea in the trunk of your tree. Each branch from the tree trunk represents a new idea and paragraph to support your central idea. Add smaller branches or leaves (at least three, but preferably six) to each of the three supporting idea branches. On those branches or leaves write specific details (examples, explanations, evidence, elaboration, experiences, who, what, when, where, why, how) about EACH of your three supporting ideas. This organizes your work into three paragraphs, complete with your topic sentence ideas.

 

  • LIST : (Click for a sample list prewriting)

Put your central idea as the title of the list. Number 1-3 with six -eight spaces in between them. Write your three main ideas that support your title idea beside each number. In the spaces below each number, write specific details (examples, explanations, evidence, elaboration, experiences, who, what, when, where, why, how) about EACH of your three supporting ideas. This organizes your work into three paragraphs, complete with your topic sentence ideas.

 

DRAFT (Double space)

 

1.2.1 Analyzes task and composes multiple drafts when appropriate.

Refer to your prewriting plan.

Draft according to audience, purpose, and time. (Who? Why? When due?)

Assesses draft and/or feedback, decides if multiple drafts are necessary, and explains decision.-- after drafting, share with a peer who will ask you questions on your organization, details, sentences, voice, etc.

 

 

 

REVISE

 

Read your draft several times to organize, add details, combine sentences:

 

  • ADD, CUT, REWRITE:

 

1. Reread you prewriting plan and your draft to check that you have stayed on topic for audience and purpose in your draft.

 

2. Reread to add details and evidence-- show you really care about the topic by the specific details you add. Have you included a quote? an anecdote or example? another detail?

 

3. Delete (cut) unnecessary information. Reread to add vivid verbs and specific nifty nouns.

 

4. Reread for organization: Reread to make sure the sentences flow from one idea to the next with transitions.

 

5. Let a peer read your work and underline telling sentences (see example **). Rewrite your words with details to SHOW the reader your ideas.

 

6. Advanced Option: Reread to shorten some sentences and combine others for sentence fluency: begin sentences in different ways; write the first four words of each sentence-- do they all start the same? Rearrange the words in your sentences so the sentences start differently. For example:

The voters research about the candidates before voting.

Before voting, the voters research about the candidates.

 

7. Reread to add your introduction (grabber beginning-- ask a question; thesis statement) and conclusion (summary statement, leave reader with a thought).

 

EDIT

 

1.4.1 Edits for conventions (see 3.3).

 

Reread your revised draft to correct all errors. Use a dictionary or computer to check your spelling. Check you Write Source for punctuation, spelling, capitalization rules. Ask a friend to edit also.

 

PUBLISH

 

Component 1.5: Publishes text to share with audience.

 

Write your final draft.

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